Functions of Behavior

The Naming of the Functions of Behavior Review Discussion

Name the Functions of Behavior

In our first article titled Name the Functions of Behavior we introduced a framework through which we could look at behavior and its underlying structure. In this second article, we will broaden that framework to include four key functions: Replacement, imitation, resourcefulness, and independent thought. When a child displays any of these four behaviors, we can categorize them as having a plan. A plan, by definition, is an ordered set of activities, with a specific goal and a specific time period for completion. These four behaviors are a natural extension of the basic developmental needs to be able to survive and thrive in a society.

Replacement behavior occurs when a child exhibits acceptable social behavior that is not happening now or is being altered by another person or change. The child often talks to his peers and roams around the room as though they are part of the activity. They engage in joint physical activity, such as sitting, moving about, touching, and so on. These activities happen regularly in the social setting of the home, playground, school, or other community setting.

Name the Functions of Behavior,

Imitation behavior occurs when the child understands the desired outcomes from acting appropriately. For example, a child may understand the value of following directions, following rules and boundaries, and following safety procedures and so on. He may exhibit these behaviors frequently. He may actually want to be involved with the group, follow directions, follow school-wide educational guidelines, and so on. If he were to exhibit independent thinking and the ability to rise to new challenges, and the ability to explore new possibilities for learning, he may be functioning within the tier 3 system.

Independent thinking is the ability to think for oneself and to solve problems without relying on others. This ability is promoted by people who are capable of working alone and are not constrained by being part of a team. School-wide and district frameworks must take this into account when designing lesson plans and implementing lesson objectives. The name of the functions of behavior review discussion should be added to the dialogue as a means of describing an understanding of what the discussions will entail.

Learning outcomes can be promoted by teaching principals by describing the expected behavior of the student on a continuous basis. The processes used to create this learning outcome can be described on a daily basis. The name of the functions of behavior review discussion can also be added to the dialogue as a means of describing a series of expected events that occur on a daily basis.

Examples include giving students consequences for their inappropriate behaviors, setting up individualized consequences for each student, scheduling sessions with students to work on consequences, encouraging students to make progress toward their goals and achievements, and encouraging students to attend school-wide assemblies and meetings. The name of the functions of behavior review discussion can be further described as a way of describing the steps a school-wide or district system takes to evaluate the effectiveness of the processes used to create the learning outcomes. This evaluation is done periodically and must be in an ongoing process if the goal is to continually promote learning outcomes.

A final example of the use of the name of the functions of behavior review discussion is to give 2 examples. One can describe the process by which a parent gets the child to accept a certain behavior as acceptable. The other can give an example of a parent’s attempts to get the child to make slow, consistent, and deliberate adjustments in order to correct the behavior.

Each example is equally useful because both create a framework for understanding the parent-child relationship and the parent’s role in creating an atmosphere that supports responsible behavior. The name of the functions of behavior review discussion can be added as a part of a toolkit for teachers because it gives teachers an opportunity to talk about the role of the parent in creating an environment that supports healthy and appropriate behavior.

Name the Functions of Behavior – Autism & Aspergers Symptoms

In the third chapter we saw how name the functions of behavior could help us to understand the dynamics of this plan development. In this chapter we will look at a couple of different examples, one for each function. In the first example we have the substitute behavior. We will look at a teacher who wants to substitute some behavior for something better. In the second example we have the replacement of an employee, this is the more direct replacement behavior. Name the functions of behavior and you can see the answer to that first question.

Name the Functions of Behavior.

In the second step we are going to look at three sensory integration problems. In this step we are going to name the functions of behavior that incorporate information about the environment, the individual, and the external stimulus. The goal here is to name the functions of behavior that determine function. Let’s take the sensory integration problem first. Step one is to name the functions of behavior that integrate information about the environment. Step two is to name the functions of behavior that integrate information about the individual.

Step three is where we are going to look at three sensory integration problem behaviors. These are eye contact, hand motion, head movement, and facial expression. In this step we are going to take a look at what happens when you give people instructions about doing something, and they do it. We are going to name the functions of behavior that occur in this situation because the child with ASD already has a name for the action sensory integration problem, and we know what happens when the adult gives directions about doing something.

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